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Volume 8, Number 2, 2008

Abstracts

‘How can this be art?': framings of contemporary art in the news media

Kate MacNeill

This paper uses content analysis to examine 33 articles relating to contemporary art published by a Melbourne metropolitan newspaper. The research demonstrates that contemporary art was presented to readers of the newspaper within a narrow range of framings, namely controversy, promotion and human interest. This finding is broadly consistent with previous studies of political news coverage. A closer reading of the controversy articles identifies certain characteristics that are ascribed to the art and to the artists. The implications of these modes of presentation for the wider reception of contemporary art are examined. It is concluded that a strategic approach to newspaper coverage should be adopted by those who seek to encourage a greater appreciation of contemporary art among popular audiences.

 

Gen Y Journalists

Daniel Hobbs

Will the advent of new media draw generation y journalists away from traditional practices to seek new and exciting ventures in online and multimedia fields or will they maintain the professional values of the past and retain interest in print, television and radio journalism?

This research centres on an examination of generation y journalists and the effect new media and other modern technologies have on their potential career paths in the media industry; with special focus on where these future reporters, broadcasters and commentators see themselves in this ever-changing, global business.

Researched through online surveys and focus group methodology, this study shines light on the unpredictable intentions of Australia 's next crop of young journalists; what was uncovered may surprise you. Do avid new media consumers make quality new media producers? Do they wish to be online producers at all?

 

Using radio as a tool for rural development in Limpopo Province of South Africa : An evaluation of case studies

Oluyinka O Osunkunle

Between 1948 and 1990, apartheid flourished in South Africa as historically marginalized communities faced immense underdevelopment. Apartheid had its roots in the history of British, French and Dutch settlement and colonisation of Southern Africa , with the development of policies and practices of separation along racial lines. However, after 1994, various measures have been taken to address the imbalance of the past and leapfrog into an era of total national development. It is therefore important to point out that the role of the media and radio in particular in this long road to recovery cannot be overemphasized. This study therefore aims to evaluate the role of community radios in bringing about development in the rural areas of Limpopo Province in South Africa . Through critical literature review, this study traces the history of underdevelopment experienced in South Africa during the apartheid era and the advent of community radio as a tool for change and development. The history of broadcasting in South Africa , the challenges faced by the media under the apartheid era and the campaign to free the airwaves are also briefly discussed for insight.

This paper will use Radio Turf, a community radio station in Limpopo Province , South Africa as a case study and analyse the contributions of this station to community development in rural areas of Limpopo Province in South Africa . In addition, the activities of some community radio stations serving other rural areas in Limpopo Province will also be briefly discussed to evaluate their programming and communication strategies towards ensuring development in their communities. To effectively have a clear understanding of the activities and impact of Radio Turf, the researcher used theoretical analysis and focus groups interviews to tackle identified research problems. The station's programmes and its impact on the communities are also evaluated. Other vital issues that were critically evaluated include the level of community involvement in the running of the station.

 

LTTE narratives in Tamilnet: Independent media or Tiger proxy

Kasun Ubayasiri

There has been much speculation over Tamilnet’s relationship with the terrorist group, the Liberation Tigers of Tamil Eelam, and while Tamilnet fulfills a vital role in providing news coverage of a conflict theater that is subjected to the government’s draconian censorship, it has been frequently argued that Tamilnet is an elaborate media front designed to disseminate Tiger narratives.

This paper focuses on this alleged role of Tamilnet, not with the objective of labeling it a terrorist proxy, but in a bid to separate pro-Tiger narratives that may be of strategic use to the LTTE, form other news covered by the cyber news service

 

 

Editor

Professor Alan Knight,
Queensland University of Technology

Advisory Panel

Dr Yoshiko Nakano, Hong Kong University

Elliott S. Parker, Central Michigan University, USA

Dr Lee Richard Duffield, Queensland University of Technology

Dr Philip Robertson, Central Queensland University

Jim Tully, University of Canterbury, New Zealand

Dr Stephen Stockwell, Griffith University

Philip Cass, Zayed University, United Arab Emirates

Dr Steve Quinn, Zayed University, United Arab Emirates

     

Ejournalist: refereed media journal. ISSN 1444-741X