volume one
number one
number two

volume two
number one

volume three
number one
number two

volume four
number one
number two

volume five
number one
number two

volume six
number one
number two

volume eight
number one
number two

volume nine
number one
number two

volume ten
number one
number two

volume eleven
number one
number two

volume twelve
number one
number two

volume thirteen
number one
number two

volume fourteen
number one
number two

volume fifteen
number one

style notes

submit an article


Professor Gillian Triggs

A public international lawyer, Professor Triggs is -

Director of the Institute of Comparative and International Law and has a chair in law at the University of Melbourne

Australian member of the Council of Jurists for the Asia Pacific Forum for National Human Rights Institutions

Member of the Attorney General International Legal Services Advisory Council
Chair of the Board of the Australian International Health Institute.

Professor Triggs has publications in offshore petroleum rights, indigenous rights, climate change and dispute resolution under the World Trade Organisation. She provides legal advice to governments both in Australia and the Asian region and is currently writing an international law text from an Australian and regional perspective. Her books include:

T. McCormack, M. Tilbury and G. Triggs, A Century of War and Peace: Asia-Pacific Perspectives on the Centenary of the 1899 Hague Peace Conference, (2001) [1];

G. Triggs, International Law and Australian Sovereignty in Antarctica, (1 ed, 1986).

On thinking about Professor Said’s complex and diverse life it struck me that his background and experiences had given him unique preparation for his role as an activist and academic. His sense of separateness, even marginality and exile, coupled with his strategy of non-alignment with religious, political and institutional groups, gave him the courage to adopt the unpopular view, to analyse issues with uncompromising rigour and to pursue an essentially secular approach to the Palestinian/ Israeli dispute. He became in these respects the very model of a modern public intellectual. I would like to consider these aspects of Said’s life and to reflect upon how his writings have a contemporary relevance for Australians.

Gillian Triggs

Full Text

Editor

Professor Alan Knight, Central Queensland University

Advisory Panel

Dr Yoshiko Nakano, Hong Kong University

Elliott S. Parker, Central Michigan University, USA

Dr Philip Robertson, Central Queensland University

Jim Tully, University of Canterbury, New Zealand

Dr Stephen Stockwell, Griffith University

Philip Cass, Zayed University, United Arab Emirates

Dr Steve Quinn, Zayed University, United Arab Emirates

     

Ejournalist is published by ejournalism.au.com, Faculty of Informatics and Communication, Central Queensland University