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Volume 2, Number 1, 2002


Abstracts

Robojourno: Reframing the Talking Head

By Philip Robertson

From a case-study of a visually impaired student learning to operate in a fully digital broadcast newsroom, this paper moves to a consideration of issues of equity, access, ethics, and truth brought into play by the digital revolution. If the new journalist transforms into a multi-skilled mobile studio, half-human, half-machine, operating in a global multi-mediascape. Who misses out, what happens to the news agenda, and what are the implications for educators?

 

The more things change: Women, politics and the press in Australia

By Cathy Jenkins

Female politicians have long complained that the media treat them differently from their male colleagues. This paper analyses the press treatment of the first female MPs, members of cabinet and government leaders in the States, Territories and the Commonwealth. The original study began with Edith Cowan in 1921 and ended with Joan Kirner in 1990. However this paper will also include discussion of contemporary female politicians who have more recently received coverage as the Other.

 

eTerror : Journalism, Terrorism and the Internet

By Alan Knight and Kasun Ubayasiri

The Internet has atomised the media and journalists are losing their monopoly on international news. This paper analyses the Internet presence of five US proscribed terrorist organisations – Hizballah, Kahane Chai, Basque Fatherland and Liberty (ETA) The Popular Front of the Liberation of Palestine (PFLP) and the Liberation Tigers of Tamil Eelam (LTTE), and analyse how they utilise the Internet to distribute their propaganda to a wider global audience.

 

Beyond Party propaganda: A case study of China' rising commercialised press

By Chengju Huang, Chris Lawe Davies, and Alan Knight

As a result of post-Mao China's market-oriented socio-economic reforms in general and media commercialisation in particular in the past two decades, media structure in China has become increasingly diverse. This has been typically reflected in the sharp rise of the newly commercialised news media sector, which represented one of the most significant changes in post-Mao Chinese journalism. Generally, current Chinese news media can be divided into two major categories: traditional Party news media (consist of Party newspapers, main radio and television stations, and the Party's key political periodicals that are directly controlled by, and to be responsible to, the Chinese Communist Party's propaganda departments at various levels), and commercialised news media (normally belong to, and are supervised by, major Party news media, government departments or their sub-units, or semi-official civilian organisations such as women associations, trade unions, scientific research institutions, or enterprises). Instead of imposing a homogeneous and monolithic regulation policy on the country's substantial media industry, post-Mao Chinese authorities, while generally focusing their controls on Party news media, have significantly relaxed their controls over newly commercialised news media. Consequently, they enjoy considerably higher autonomy in topic selection and contents than their counterparts in the Party news media sector as addressed in this study.

Editor

Professor Alan Knight, Central Queensland University

Advisory Panel

Dr Yoshiko Nakano, Hong Kong University

Elliott S. Parker, Central Michigan University, USA

Dr Philip Robertson, Central Queensland University

Jim Tully, University of Canterbury, New Zealand

Dr Stephen Stockwell, Griffith University

Philip Cass, Zayed University, United Arab Emirates

Dr Steve Quinn, Zayed University, United Arab Emirates

     

Ejournalist is published by ejournalism.au.com, Faculty of Informatics and Communication, Central Queensland University