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Volume 14, Number 2, 2014

Abstracts

Survey of New Zealand journalists: They enjoy the job, despite everything

Dr Grant Hannis, Dr James Hollings, Dr Karl Pajo and A/Prof Geoff Lealand

This article reports the results of a survey of New Zealand full-time journalists. The workforce is relatively young, primarily of European ethnicity, and receives average pay. Although the workforce is predominately female, men outnumber women in senior management. New media is increasing in importance, but conventional media still employs three-quarters of journalists. Although respondents believed ethics was an important element of the job, they acknowledged there were times when controversial methods were justified. Respondents had a positive view of their industry - despite frustrations over lack of resources, they enjoy the variety and importance of the job. Most respondents said they became journalists because they enjoyed writing, meeting people and making a difference.

 

The “virtuous circle”: A case study examining the case for the better embedding of Work Integrated Learning approaches into university journalism curriculums.

A/Prof Leo Bowman, and Jennifer Thomas

This paper explores the potential to focus and develop the approach of Work Integrated Learning (WIL) in those journalism courses where this method is seen as a core principal of the program. It argues, that, in many cases, such approaches are ill defined and underdeveloped, a fact that weakens the possibility for strong course outcomes. It then examines the particular case of QUT coverage of the 2014 G20 Leaders’ Summit to illustrate how an all-of-course WIL approach to G20 coverage - coupled with a tailored interaction with the library - might provide an enhanced student experience as well as unlock the potential for greater knowledge transfer between university journalism courses and industry partners.

 

 

Editor

Professor Alan Knight,
University of Technology, Sydney

Advisory Panel

Dr Judith Clarke, Baptist University, Hong Kong

Elliott S. Parker, Central Michigan University, USA

Dr Lee Richard Duffield, Queensland University of Technology

Jim Tully, University of Canterbury, New Zealand

Dr Kasun Ubayasiri, Griffith University, Brisbane

Philip Cass, Unitec, Auckland, New Zealand

Dr Stephen Stockwell, Griffith University, Gold Coast

Dr Steve Quinn, University of Nottingham, Ningbo, China

     

Ejournalist: refereed media journal. ISSN 1444-741X